Confirmed Speakers

Confirmed Speakers

mTOR Independent Regulation of Mitochondrial Metabolism and Autophagy by Akt

Dale Abel


Dale Abel
University of Iowa, USA

Biography TBA

Regulation of Apoptosis by Bcl-2 Family Proteins

David Andrews


David Andrews
University of Toronto, Canada

Dr. David Andrews is director of and senior scientist in Biological Sciences at Sunnybrook Research Institute (SRI) and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair. His research comprises, the molecular mechanisms by which Bcl-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis, the assembly of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, high-content screening and development of new microscopes for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and hyperspectral imaging. Dr. Andrews uses fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopic microscopy to study interactions between proteins in membranes using purified proteins and in live cells. He has established a facility for image-based high-content cellular analysis at SRI that includes the most sophisticated FLIM instruments available in the world. His lab has discovered small molecules that have application to cancer and regenerative medicine.

Dr. Andrews has collaborated with a number of pharmaceutical companies including ABBVIE, Eli Lilly, Genentech and others and is a member of scientific advisory boards including at the Max Plank Institute. He holds licensed patents in areas such as translational regulation, in vitro evolution, peptide display technologies and optical microscopy, and has participated in start-up companies. He is developing a new generation automated high-speed hyperspectral FLIM confocal that is being commercialized.

Endogenous RNAs as Virulence Factors in Parasitic Protozoa

Stephen Beverley


Stephen Beverley
Washington University, USA

Biography TBA

β-Catenin Is Required for T Cell Leukemia Initiation and MYC Transcription Downstream of Notch1

Anna Bigas


Anna Bigas
Program de Recerca en Cancer, Spain

Biography TBA

Molecular Bases of the Metabolic Programs of Neurons and Astrocytes

Juan Bolanos


Juan Bolanos
Universidad de Salamanca, Spain

Juan P. Bolaños (Spain, 1964) studied and performed his PhD at the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Salamanca (Spain). After research stays in Oxford (UK) as a Biochemical Society Unilever Fellow, and in London (UK) as an EU Marie Curie post-doc (Institute of Neurology-University College London), he became Lecturer (1996) and Professor (2007) in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (University of Salamanca). He was the Academic Secretary of this Department, Research Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Pharmacy, President of the European Society for Neurochemistry (ESN) and, currently, council member of the Spanish Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (SEBBM). He belongs to the Editorial Boards of several scientific journals, including the Biochemical Journal and the Journal of Neurochemistry. He received several awards, including the Marie Curie Excellence Award in 2005 (EU), and four Editor of the Year Awards of the Biochemical Journal. He has chaired the organizing committees of four international conferences (2007-2011), and currently chairs the SEBBM Annual Conference (Salamanca, Spain, 5-8 September, 2016). His group is interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate the energetic and redox homeostasis in the brain cells. They identified that the glycolytic-promoting enzyme PFKFB3 is subjected to ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation by APC/C-Cdh1 (Nat Cell Biol. 2009). Currently, his group studies the molecular mechanisms responsible for the metabolic and redox adaptation of neurons and astrocytes to neurotransmission. Understanding these issues would allow identifying metabolic targets, the genetic alterations of which can contribute to neurotransmission malfunctioning and neurological problems.

Lipids and mTOR Signaling

Patricia Bozza


Patricia Bozza
FIOCRUZ, IOC, Brazil

Biography TBA

Can Tumor Growth Be Controlled by Controlling Lipid Synthesis?

Beatriz Caputto


Beatriz Caputto
Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina

Biography TBA

Signalling Networks of Plant Photo-Sensory Receptors

Jorge Casal


Jorge Casal
IFEVA, Argentina

PhD (Leicester University, UK). Senior Researcher (CONICET, National Research Council of Argentina). Professor at the Faculty of Agronomy, University of Buenos Aires. Vice-Director of IFEVA institute. Head of the Laboratory of Plant Molecular Physiology at Leloir Institute. He has obtained the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2002) and the Georg Forster Research Award of the Humboldt Foundation (2014). He investigates the molecular and cellular mechanisms and the functional implications of plant responses to the light environment of crops. He has published more than 140 articles in international journals. Associate Editor of Plant Journal, Plant Molecular Biology, Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences (2003-2013) and Spanish Journal of Agricultural Research (2003-2012). Member of the editorial board of Trends in Plant Science and BMC Plant Biology.

SLC4A11- A Membrane Transport Protein Causing Corneal Blindness

Joseph Casey


Joseph Casey
University of Alberta, Canada

Joseph (Joe) Casey received B.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Biochemistry from Queen’s University (Kington, Canada) and University of Toronto (with Dr. Reinhart Reithmeier), respectively. Following three years of postdoctoral studies at Stanford University (with Dr. Ron Kopito), Joe took up a faculty position at the University of Alberta. Since 2006 he has been a Full Professor of Biochemistry (adjunct Physiology) and is Director of the Membrane Protein Disease Research Group and International Research Training Group in Membrane Biology. Throughout his career, Joe’s passion has been membrane transport proteins, with a focus on the SLC4 family of bicarbonate transporters.

Galectin-3 Determines the Survival Strategy of Tumor Cells in Stressed Microenvironments

Roger Chammas


Roger Chammas
Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil

Roger Chammas, MD-PhD concluded his studies in Medicine (1988) and got his PhD degree in Biochemistry (1993) at Universidade de São Paulo, while working at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (1989-1993). He specialized in Glycobiology at University of California, San Diego (1994-1997) and was a visiting researcher at Friedrich-Miescher Institute, Basel (1991), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston (1993), Universidade Federal de São Paulo (1998-1999) and Moffitt Cancer Research Center, Tampa (2011-2012). Chammas is presently Full Professor of Oncology at Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, where he directs the Center for Translational Research in Oncology, at Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo, a specialized institute for cancer patient management and oncology teaching and research. Chammas serves as academic editor for Plos One, Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research and Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências. His major interests are in the area of Cancer Biology (Biochemistry and Cancer Cell Biology), focusing in tumor progression, carbohydrate-dependent tumor markers and tumor microenvironments, as targets for combination therapy and molecular diagnostics through imaging in cancers.

Destabilization of  Ras via Targeting the Wnt/Beta-Catein Pathway is a Potential Therapy for Colorectal Cancer

Kang-Yell Choi


Kang-Yell Choi
Yonsei University, Korea

Upon completion of his doctorate in Biochemistry at the Purdue University in 1993, Dr. Kang-Yell Choi performed research related with cell signaling at Harvard Medical School as a postdoctoral fellow. His research at Harvard investigated the function of Saccharomyces Ste5 involving pheromone response via MAP kinase pathway and was published as the 1st paper introducing the concept of \\\”Scaffold Protein\\\” in the community. In 1995, he returned back to Korea as a professor of Yonsei University. Since then, he has been working on mammalian cell signaling. Dr. Choi identified a novel mechanism of Ras stability regulation via the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. The degradation of Ras, especially K-Ras, is controlled by GSK3b-mediated phosphorylation followed by ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal machinery via recruiting b-TrCP E3 ligase. The stabilization of oncogenic K-Ras by APC loss and subsequent re-activation the Wnt/b-catenin pathway via positive loop through ERK activated cancer stem cells and induced liver metastasis of colorectal cancer. This indicates the importance of inhibition of both Wnt/b-catenin and Ras-ERK pathways in the treatment of colorectal cancer. He subsequently identified and characterized small molecules degrading both b-catanin and Ras via targeting the Wnt/b-catenin signaling, and those small molecules efficiently inhibit growth of colorectal and other cancers with activated Wnt/beta-catenin and EGFR-Ras pathways. He served as the Chief of the National Research Laboratory of the Molecular Complex Control for recent 5 years, and currently positioned as the Director of the Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Panning of Korea.

Mechanisms Operated by Caffeine and Adenosine A2A Receptors to Control Synaptic Plasticity and Neurodegeneration

Rogrigo Cunha


Rogrigo Cunha
Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal

Rodrigo A. Cunha is a Professor at the Faculty of Medicine and Principal Investigator at the Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology of the University of Coimbra (CNC). He is part of the Steering Committee of the European Neuroscience Campus and the National representative of the Network of European Neuroscience Institutes. He heads the group ‘Purines at CNC’, focusing on caffeine neuroprotection and purinergic modulation; his group is constituted by 5 resident PhD researchers, 7 post-docs and 8 PhD students. He has published over 200 papers with an h factor of 50. He has trained over 25 PhD students and 15 post-doctoral fellows and attracted funds from American and European agencies and private companies. The most relevant contributions of the group were the definition of the role of adenosine A2A receptors in the control of synaptic plasticity and their main role in operating the neuroprotective potential of caffeine in different animal models of disease such as Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease, chronic stress or epilepsy. This prompts the proposal that A2A receptors are key modulators of information flow in brain circuits, making then promising targets to manage conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease or depression.

The Many Lives of Antibodies to Gangliosides: Implications in Developing and Improvement of Immunotherapies

Jose Luis Daniotti


Jose Luis Daniotti
Univerfsidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina

Dr. Jose Luis Daniotti received his Ph.D. in 1992 at the Centro de Investigaciones en Química Biológica de Córdoba (CIQUIBIC, UNC-CONICET)-Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina. He then spent two years as a post-doctoral fellow at the Universidad de Chile (ICGEB Fellow) and NIDRC, National Institute of Health (Fogarty Fellow). He is currently working at CIQUIBIC-University of Córdoba and has been Full Professor of Cellular and Molecular Biology since 2010. At present, Dr. Daniotti is interested in studying the cellular processes involved in the synthesis, intracellular distribution and degradation of glycolipids. In particular, he is interested in the synthesis, and endocytic and exocytic transport of gangliosides both in polarized and non-polarized epithelial cells. He also studies the binding, internalization and intracellular fate of anti-glycolipid antibodies. To know in detail these issues would allow understanding the potential effect of anti-glycolipid antibodies associated to peripheral neuropathies and their use in anti-cancer immunotherapies. In another research line, he investigates the cellular mechanisms that control and regulate the process of protein S-acylation as well as the consequences of this covalent modification on the subcellular distribution and function of acylated polypeptides such as isoforms of the GTPase Ras. During his career he has authored 60 research papers and scientific review articles. Dr. Daniotti has received several awards, including the Bernardo Houssay Award, National Secretary of Science and Technology, Argentina (2003), the Hermann Burmeister Award, National Academy of Science, Argentina (2004) and Bernardo Houssay Award 2010, Ministry of Science and Technology, Argentina (2011).

Nucleosomal Response Pathway and Gene Programming

James Davie


James Davie, RSC Award Winner (2015)
University of Manitoba, Canada

Dr. Jim Davie received his B.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of British Columbia. His post-doctoral training was with Dr. Ken van Holde at Oregon State University. Dr. Davie is presently a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics at the University of Manitoba. He serves on several Editorial Boards of journals publishing in Biochemistry, Cell Biology and Molecular Biology and is Editor of the journal Biochemistry and Cell Biology. He has served as Chair and panel member on Peer Review Committees. He directs the Manitoba Next Generation DNA Sequencing platform, which provides state-of-the-art genomic DNA sequencing to Manitoba researchers. His research interests include epigenetic regulation of gene expression in normal and diseased cells, signal transduction pathways, and biomarkers in the detection of disease. He holds a Canada Research Chair in Chromatin Dynamics. Dr. Davie is a Councillor of the Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences. In 2015, he was inducted as a Fellow into the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences and the Royal Society of Canada.

Integrin Linked Kinase (ILK) in Development and Disease

Shoukat Dedhar


Shoukat Dedhar
BC Cancer Agency, Canada

Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, and Distinguished Scientist, Department of Integrative Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada. Dr Dedhar received his BSc(Hons) in Biochemistry from the University in Aberdeen, Scotland, and his PhD from the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, Canada in 1984. He carried out a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the laboratory of Dr. Erkki Ruoslahti at the Burnham Institute, in La Jolla, California, USA. Dr Dedhar is a Distinguished Scientist at the BC Cancer Agency and Full Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at University of British Columbia ( UBC). He is noted for his discovery of Integrin-Linked Kinase (ILK) and his research is currently focused on the role of ILK signaling in cancer progression, the molecular basis and targeting of centrosome clustering in cancer cells, and therapeutic targeting of tumor hypoxia effectors, Carbonic Anhydrases IX and XII. Dr Dedhar has received several awards, including the Distinguished Scholar award from the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR) , the Terry Fox Cancer Research Scientist award of the National Cancer Institute of Canada ( NCIC), Distinguished medical research lectureship award of UBC, and the Robert L Noble Prize (2013), for “Outstanding achievement in Cancer Research”. Dr Dedhar is co-founder of SignalChem Lifesciences Corp (SLC), a Biotechnology company developing novel therapeutics targeting Protein kinases, Tumor Hypoxia and Metabolism. Dr. Dedhar is an author of over 200 peer- reviewed papers and review articles, and an inventor on 24 patents.

Cytochrome C: A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing

Irene Diaz-Moreno


Irene Diaz-Moreno
University of Sevilla, Spain

Irene Díaz-Moreno is Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Institute of Plant Biochemistry and Photosynthesis (IBVF) at the Scientific Research Centre Isla de la Cartuja (cicCartuja) in Spain. She received her PhD degree in 2005 with European mention from the University of Seville. In collaboration with Göteborg (Sweden) and Leiden (The Netherlands) Universities, she worked on molecular recognition between metalloproteins involved in electron-transfer processes. Later, she was an EMBO postdoctoral fellow until 2008 at the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR-MRC) in London (UK), where she worked on the regulation mechanisms of mRNA decay by RNA-binding proteins. In 2010, she received a permanent position at the University of Seville (US), where she is developing research projects on Biointeractomics field, as well as on the posttranslational regulation of biological macromolecules. She has published peer-reviewed articles in high quality journals including Nature Structure and Molecular Biology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, Nucleic Acids Research, Structure, JBC and FEBS Lett., among others. Irene Díaz-Moreno has also been invited to speak at numerous international congresses and scientific meetings and has attracted many prizes. These include her PhD award of Special Distinction, Young Investigator Awards in 2005 and 2008, “Manuel Losada Villasante” Prize to Excellent Young Scientists in 2014 and the Spanish Biophysics Society Award to Young Researchers in 2015. She acts as a reviewer in scientific journals (FEBS Lett., J. Biol. Inorg. Chem., Nucleic Acids Res., RNA Biol., BBA.), PhD and Masters theses as well as research international and European grants. She has participated as guest editor for Special Issues of the European Biophysics Journal, FEBS Journal and IUBMB Life Journal. She is also a member of the Editorial Board of IUBMB Life Journal since 2013, IUBMB Wood-Whelan Research Fellowships Committee since 2009, FEBS Advanced Course Committee since 2015 and Chair of the IUBMB Nominating Committee since 2015. She was a member of the Organizing Committee of FEBS Workshop 2007 in Seville (Spain), Chair of FEBS-IUBMB Workshop 2010 and Scientific Secretariat of the 22nd IUBMB and 37th FEBS Congress 2012 in Seville (Spain). Moreover, Irene Díaz-Moreno is a member of scientific societies including: Spanish Societies of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2001-), Spanish Society of Biophysics (2012-) & Royal Spanish Society of Chemistry (2001-).

Controlling the Balance of Self-Renewal and Differentiation in Human Brain Tumors

Peter Dirks


Peter Dirks
Hospital for Sick Children, Canada

Biography TBA

Workshop on Biochemistry Education and Communication

Diane Ebert-May


Diane Ebert-May
Michigan State University, USA

Biography TBA

Regulatory RNA

Andrew Fire


Andrew Fire, Nobel Prize Winner (2006)
Stanford University, USA

A native of Santa Clara County, California, Dr. Fire received training at UC Berkeley (Mathematics BA: 1975-1978), MIT (Biology Ph.D.: 1978-1983), and the Medical Research Council Laboratory in Cambridge UK (Postdoctoral: 1983-1986). From 1986 to 2003, Dr. Fire was on the staff of the Carnegie Institution of Washington’s Department of Embryology in Baltimore Maryland. During his time in Baltimore, Dr. Fire assumed the position of Adjunct Professor of Biology at Johns Hopkins University. In 2003, Dr. Fire joined the faculty of the Departments of Pathology and Genetics at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Non Canonical Inflammasome Activation During Malaria

Ricardo Gazzineli


Ricardo Gazzineli
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil

Biography TBA

Integrins Facilitate Fc Receptor Ligation and Src-Family Kinase Activation during Phagocytosis

Sergio Grinstein
Sergio Grinstein
University of Toronto, CanadaDr. Sergio Grinstein completed his Ph.D. in 1976 at the Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados, in Mexico City. He then spent two years as a post-doctoral fellow at the Hospital For Sick Children in Toronto, followed by a year in the Department of Biochemistry at the Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. He is currently working at the Hospital For Sick Children in Toronto and has been Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Toronto since 1988. Dr. Grinstein is interested in the cell physiology and biophysics of innate immunity, particularly phagocytosis and host-pathogen interactions.

Signaling in Regulatory B Cell Induction in Trypanosoma Cruzi Infection

Adriana Gruppi


Adriana Gruppi
CIBICI, Argentina

Adriana Gruppi is Biochemist and PhD in Immunology, both grades obtained at the ¨Universidad Nacional de Córdoba¨ in Argentine. She is Professor of Immunology at the School of Chemical Sciences of the mentioned university and Principal Researcher of CONICET (National research Council of Argentine). She focused her lab research program on B cell immunity. Dr Gruppi oversees many studies conducted to know how T. cruzi infection triggers B cell apoptosis and also how this infection induces IL-17+ and IL-10+ and PD-L1+ regulatory B cells. Dr Gruppi has made significant contributions to the field of B cell response in non-infection conditions. She identified molecules involved in B-cell survival and differentiation. Nowadays, her lab members are characterizing the antibody-independent role that B-cells play in T.cruzi infection, cancer and autoimmunity.

Molecular Chaperones in Protein Folding and Proteostasis Maintenance

Ulrich Hartl


Ulrich Hartl, Gairdner Award Winner (2004)
Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Germany

Ulrich Hartl received an MD and doctoral degree in Biochemistry from the University of Heidelberg. In 1985 he joined the department of Walter Neupert at Munich University where he worked on the mechanism of protein transport into mitochondria, first as a post-doctoral fellow and then as a group leader. In 1988 Hartl initiated work that resulted in the demonstration of the basic role of molecular chaperones in protein folding. The period in Neupert’s laboratory was interrupted by a stay with William Wickner at UCLA, where Hartl worked on the mechanism of bacterial protein export. In 1990 he joined the faculty of Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York where he investigated the mechanisms of protein folding in the bacterial and eukaryotic cytosol. He reconstituted the pathway of chaperone-assisted folding in which the Hsp70 and the GroEL chaperone systems cooperate and discovered that GroEL and its co-factor GroES provide a nano-cage for single protein molecules to fold unimpaired by aggregation. In 1993 Hartl was promoted to Full Professor with tenure, and in 1994 was made HHMI investigator. In 1997 he returned to Munich as the Director of the Department of Cellular Biochemistry at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry. Hartl has received several national and international awards, including the Gairdner Award in 2004, the Heineken Prize in Biochemistry and Biophysics in 2010, the Lasker Award in 2011 and the Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine in 2012. He is a Foreign Associate of the National Academy.

Linking Light Perception and Stress Responses in the Filamentous Fungus Trichoderma Atroviride

Alfredo Herrera-Estrella


Alfredo Herrera-Estrella
CINVESTAV, Mexico

Alfredo Herrera-Estrella grew up in Mexico City and graduated from National School of Biological Sciences in 1985. He did his graduate research (1986-1990) with Prof. Marc Van Montagu at the State University of Ghent, Belgium, studying the T-DNA transfer process from Agrobacterium tumefaciens to plants. He described for the first time Agrobacterium virulence proteins capable of carrying the T-DNA into the plant cell nucleus, and began to study the mycoparasitic process of the biocontrol agent Trichoderma atroviride, and continued those studies while at the Genetic Engineering Department of the Irapuato Unit of Cinvestav (1991-2004). Later he began studies towards the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in light responses in Trichoderma and continues on that line of research. In 2000, he was awarded the prize of the Mexican Academy of Sciences. By 2004, he became involved in the establishment of the National Laboratory of Genomics for Biodiversity. Since then he and his group have been involved in Functional Genomics Projects, including the elucidation of the complete maize and bean genomes, and the the study of changes in gene expression in response to environmental signals. Recently, his group discovered a mechanism of response to mechanical damage in fungi conserved across kingdoms.

Genomic Analysis for Personalized Medicine

Steven Jones


Steven Jones
BC Cancer Agency, Canada

Biography TBA

Cell Type-Specific Regulation by Intragenic CpG Islands

Young-Joon Kim


Young-Joon Kim
Yonsei University, Korea

Dr. Kim’s work is focused on the regulatory mechanism of mouse innate immune system and epigenetic regulation of disease-associated genes. Dr. Kim received his BS from Seoul National University, and his Ph.D. from the Stanford University. Following his postdoctoral research at the Roger Kornberg’s laboratory at the Stanford University, he joined Samsung Biomedical Research Institute in 1994, and later moved to the Yonsei University in 2000. Dr. Kim received numerous awards and honors, including the Life Science Research Award from Korean Molecular and Cell Biology Society (2006). He has served on the AACR international human epigenome taskforce team (2004-2005), Review committee (2003-2008) and Council of Scientists (2008-2014) of Human Frontier Science Foundation. He also organized several international congresses as the Chair of the Academic Program Committee in the Federation of Asian and Oceanian Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Conference (2007), and International Cell Biology Congress (2008).

 

Insulin Signals Leading to GLUT4 Translocation in Muscle Cells

Amira Klip


Amira Klip
Hospital for Sick Children, Canada

Dr. Amira Klip received her PhD in Biochemistry at CINVESTAV in Mexico City in 1976. She did postdoctoral training at The University of Toronto, Canada (U of T) in the laboratory of Dr. David MacLennan and a second postdoctoral period at the ETH in Zurich, Switzerland. She was then hired as a research associate in Neurology at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto (SickKids), and in 1980 she obtained an MRC Scholarship that lounged her independent career. Dr. Klip is currently a Senior Scientist at SickKids and a Professor of Paediatrics, Biochemistry and Physiology at U of T. Dr. Klip’s work deals with the regulation of glucose uptake into muscle by insulin and muscle contraction, and its failure leading to insulin resistance. In a career spanning 35 years, she has directed over 40 graduate students and 47 postdoctoral fellows, has published over 230 original papers and 80 chapters/review articles, and been a member of national and international advisory boards. She particularly enjoys her mentorship role, and was the founding director of the Research Training Centre at SickKids. She was an Associate Chief of Research at that Institution for almost 16 years. She is an active member of the Canadian research enterprise, an elected fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences, and the recipient of many national and international awards. Her research operation has been supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Banting and Best Diabetes Centre, and the Canadian Diabetes Association.

Caloric Restriction Increases Brain Mitochondrial Calcium Retention Capacity and Protects Against Excitotoxicity

Alicia Kowaltowski


Alicia Kowaltowski
Universidade de Sào Paulo, Brazil

Alicia Kowaltowski completed her medical training (1997) and PhD (1999) at the State University of Campinas, Brazil, having done part of her doctoral work in the University of Maryland in Baltimore, USA. Her post-doctoral training was concluded in 2000 at the Oregon Graduate Institute, USA. She was then hired by the Department of Biochemistry, University of São Paulo, Brazil, where she is currently a Full Professor and President of the Graduate Studies Committee. She is also Vice-President for Education for the Society for Free Radical Biology & Medicine and chaired the Gordon Research Conference on Oxygen Radicals in 2014. She specializes in the understanding of the relationships between energy metabolism, mitochondrial ion transport and redox state and is the author of more than 100 peer-reviewed international publications, which have accumulated over 6000 citations, with an H-factor of 42. She is a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow (2006) and recipient of the CAPES-Elsevier Award (2014).

Telomeres, Telomerase and Aging

Peter Lansdorp


Peter Lansdorp
University of Groningen, Netherlands

Peter Lansdorp (MD, PhD, FRSC) was born and raised in the Netherlands. In 1985 he moved to the Terry Fox Laboratory of the BC Cancer Research Center in Vancouver, where his work on the purification and culture of human and murine hematopoietic stem cells led him to studies of telomere biology. He developed quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH) techniques to measure the length of telomere repeats in chromosomes and cells that have been widely adopted. Current interests are related to the role of guanine quadruplex (G4) structures in biology and the possibility that gene expression and cell fate is regulated in part by chromatin differences between sister chromatids. Peter Lansdorp is a Distinguished Scientist at the Terry Fox Laboratory and an affiliated Professor at the University of British Columbia. In 2010 he was appointed to an Endowed Chair at the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG). He is the first Scientific Director of the European Research Institute for the Biology of Ageing of the University of Groningen and the UMCG. In 2011 Peter Lansdorp received an Advanced Grant from the European Research Council for a research project on the role of telomeres and stem cells in ageing.

Fungal Circadian RhythmsSynthetic Biology: From a Hybrid Circadian Oscillator to the Generation of Live Images and Clock-based Eidetic Memory

Peter Lansdorp


Luis Larrondo
Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile

Dr. Larrondo was born and raised in Santiago, Chile, where he received a Ph.D in Cellular and Molecular Biology at the P. Universidad Católica de Chile. With the support of the PEW foundation he conducted his postdoctoral work at Dartmouth Medical School (EE.UU) where he became interested in fungal functional genomics and circadian regulation. In 2009, he then went back to his home institution, in Chile, where he is now and associate professor and the director of the Millennium Nucleus for Fungal Integrative and Synthetic Biology. Currently, his lab works with different fungal systems studying the molecular mechanisms underlying biological oscillators, and assessing the impact that circadian clocks have on physiology and in host-pathogen interactions. Through optogenetics and synthetic biology-based approaches his lab is also exploring the design of new oscillatory circuits capable of starting and sustaining circadian rhythms.

Cell Signaling Pathways in Cardiac Autophagy

Peter Lansdorp


Sergio Lavandero
Universidad de Chile, Chile

Dr Sergio Lavandero is Full Professor with positions in two academic units (Faculty of Chemical & Pharmaceutical Sciences & Faculty of Medicine) of the Universidad de Chile. Also Dr Lavandero holds an Adjunct Professor position in the Cardiology Division, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas, Texas). He is author of 210 publications in ISI journals (total citation: 9,310, h index: 41). He is currently Director and Principal Investigator in the FONDAP Advanced Center for Chronic Diseases (2014-2024) and Principal Investigator in the Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell (CEMC). He is member of the editorial boards of Circulation, American Journal of Physiology (Endocrinology & Metabolism section), Cell Death & Diseases and BBA Molecular Basis of Diseases, Ad hoc reviewer in many international journals and international scientific research funding institutions. He is an active member in national and international scientific societies (i.e. American Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, International Cell Death Society, ISHR, AHA, Chilean Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Chilean Society for Cardiology) and member of the Chilean Academy of Science. He was President of the Chilean Society of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (2013-2014), President and representative member for Biology in the Higher Council of Science in FONDECYT (2003-2004), Vice-President of Research and Development (2013-2014) of the Universidad de Chile.

Harnessing the Biology of Glycosphingolipid Trafficking for Biologic Drug Delivery

Wayne Lencer


Wayne Lencer
Harvard Medical School, USA

Biography TBA

Arsenic Transport by Human MRP1 (ABCC1) is Selectively Modified by Phosphorylation and N GlycosylationTransport Proteins and Toxicity

Peter Lansdorp


Elaine Leslie
University of Alberta, Canada

Elaine M. Leslie is currently an Associate Professor in the Departments of Physiology and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. She is an Alberta Innovates Health Solutions Scholar. She received her BSc in Toxicology from the University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada and her PhD in Pharmacology and Toxicology from Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada. Dr. Leslie completed postdoctoral training at the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA and at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA. Dr. Leslie has a long-standing interest in the involvement of ATP-binding cassette transporters and phase II biotransformation enzymes in detoxification. The current focus of the Leslie laboratory is understanding how multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs/ABCCs) and glutathione S-transferases are involved in the detoxification of arsenic (a proven human carcinogen).

Phosphotyrosine Profiling

Shawn Li


Shawn Li
Western University, Canada

Biography TBA

The Chromatin Organization Reveals Functional Noncoding Mutations in Breast Cancer

Mathieu Lupien
Mathieu Lupien
Princess Margaret Hospital, CanadaDr. Mathieu Lupien has been a scientist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre since 2012 and is an assistant professor in the Department of Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto. He also has a cross-appointment with the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR). He earned his Ph.D. at McGill University (Montreal, Canada) in 2005, followed by post-doctoral training in medical oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School (Boston, MA) as an Era of Hope fellow. Dr. Lupien completed his post-doctoral training in 2008 and was recruited as a faculty member at the Dartmouth Medical School (Hanover, NH) in 2009, where he became Director of the Quantitative Epigenomics Laboratory. Dr. Lupien is recognized for three seminal discoveries, namely that epigenetic modifications on histones can discriminate cell type-specific noncoding gene regulatory elements; that epigenetic alterations at gene regulatory elements underlie cancer initiation and progression and that noncoding genetic alterations promoting cancer development preferentially target gene regulatory elements. Among other honours, Dr. Lupien is a recipient of the Investigator Award from the OICR, the New Investigator Salary Award from CIHR, The Rising Star in Prostate Cancer Research award from PCC/Movember and the Till and McCulloch Discovery of the Year award.

Exploiting Oxidative Stress in Cancer

Tak Mak, Gairdner Award Winner (1989)
University of Toronto, Canada

Tak Wah Mak is internationally known for his work in the molecular biology of cancer and the immune system. He is a Professor in the Department of Medical Biophysics and the Department of Immunology at the University of Toronto; the Director of the Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, and a Senior Scientist at the Ontario Cancer Institute. Dr. Mak is a world leader in the genetics of immunology and cancer. In 1984, he led the group that discovered the T cell receptor, and his published work on the cloning of T cell antigen receptor genes has been cited over 1,200 times. Since this landmark discovery, Dr. Mak has focused on elucidating the mechanisms underlying immune responses and tumorigenesis. He pioneered the use of genetically engineered mouse strains to identify genetic susceptibility factors associated with various immune disorders or different types of cancer. In particular, his team discovered that CTLA4 is a negative regulator of T cell activation (cited 2,000 times), paving the way for the development of anti-CTLA4 agents now in clinical use for autoimmune diseases. Dr. Mak’s lab also made major contributions to defining the functions of PTEN (cited more than 2,000 times) as well as the relationship between the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 and defects in DNA repair. Most recently, Dr. Mak’s studies of the functions of various gene products in normal and cancerous cells are yielding important information on their biology that is crucial for the identification of new drug targets and the development of more effective cancer therapies. Dr. Mak was named an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2000. Other recognitions include: Gairdner Foundation International Award (Canada) Foreign Associate of the National Academy of Sciences (USA) Fellow of the Royal Society (UK) King Faisal Prize for Medicine (Saudi Arabia) Sloan Prize of the GM Cancer Foundation (USA) Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize (Germany).

The GRK2 Signaling Hub in the Molecular Physiopathology of Obesity-Related Diseases

Frederico Mayor
Centro de Biologia Molecular, Spain

Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Departamento de Biología Molecular and Centro de Biología Molecular \”Severo Ochoa\”, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain. PhD in Biochemistry 1983 (Universidad Autónoma, Madrid). Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow at the laboratory of Dr. R. J. Lefkowitz, Duke University, North Carolina, USA (1985-1986). His laboratory investigates key nodes in signalling networks involved in prevalent age-related pathologies such as metabolic/diabetes/cardiovascular diseases and cancer, with emphasis in G protein-coupled receptors and the interactome of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). He has authored more than 100 papers in prestigious international journals. Principal Investigator in research projects funded by public and private Spanish institutions, pharmaceutical companies and the European Union. President of the Spanish Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, SEBBM (2012-2016). Chairman of the Department of Molecular Biology. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (2005- 2013). Director, Centro de Biología Molecular \”Severo Ochoa\” (Spanish Research Council and Universidad Autónoma, Madrid) (1998-2002). Member of different Scientific Advisory Boards.

Mechanisms Protecting Tumor Cells from DNA Damage Induced by Chemotherapeutic Agents

Carlos Menck
Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil

Carlos Menck main research interest is on how cells respond to DNA damage, and relations with cancer and aging. He is graduated in Biology, University of São Paulo (USP), in 1977. He is Professor at the Institute of Biomedical Sciences, USP. He is Chief Editor of the Journal Genetics and Molecular Biology, and member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences. His work investigates how DNA repair capabilities are involved in cell mutagenesis and cell death, which, in human, are directly involved in processes of carcinogenesis and aging. His projects also deal with how tumor cells respond to DNA damage after anti-tumor chemotherapy drug treatment. This may help are to potentiate the action of these drugs in cancer therapy.

Circadian Rhythms in Mammals: Entrainment by Meal Timing

Ralph Mistlberger


Ralph Mistlberger
Simon Fraser University, Canada

Biography TBA

Cholesterol Homeostasis in the Brain: Link to the Alzheimer’s Disease

Aleksandra Mladenovic-Djordjevic


Aleksandra Mladenovic-Djordjevic
University of Belgrade, Serbia

Dr. Aleksandra Mladenovic Djordjevic received her B.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Belgrade, Serbia. She was awarded with the Serbian government postgraduate student fellowship (1999 -2002.) among the best 200 students in the country. Her post-doctoral training was in the Laboratory for molecular neurobiology at the Institute for Biological Research “Sinisa Stankovic” (IBISS), University of Belgrade, in the field of brain ageing. She received a tenure position at the IBISS in 2003, where she is currently an Associate Professor at the Department of Neurobiology. Her research interests include synaptic plasticity in aging, molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, cholesterol homeostasis in the brain and different therapeutic approaches in order to postpone brain ageing. Currently she leads research on molecular links between Alzheimer’s disease and cholesterol metabolism supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (collaboration with Dr. Lawrence Rajendran, University of Zurich). She is also involved as a lecturer at Neuroscience graduate program and actively mentors PhD students and is a member of dissertation Committees. She was a member of the Organizing Committee of V and VI Congress of the Serbian Neuroscience Society (2011. and 2013.) and a member of local Organizing Committee of Regional Meeting of Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FENS2015) in Thessaloniki (Greece). Moreover Aleksandra is a representative of Serbia in several Intergovernmental frameworks for the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST). She is a member of the Serbian Biochemical society, Serbian Neuroscience Society and FENS. She is an Editorial Board member of Science Matters.

Epigenetic Control of Mesenchymal Cell Fate

Martin Montecino
Andres Bello University, Chile

Martin Montecino graduated from the University of Concepcion, Chile, in 1989 and received his Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, USA, in 1996. He has been working in the field of epigenetic control of gene expression since becoming a graduate student and subsequently as an independent investigator at the University of Concepcion in 1997, at which he became Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in 2004. In 2010 he moved to the Andres Bello University, Santiago, Chile, to become Director of the Center for Biomedical Research and Deputy Director of the FONDAP Center of Excellence “Center for Genome Regulation”. During his career he has authored and co-authored more that 144 publications and has directed and co-directed numerous nationally and internationally funded research grants in the field of gene regulation mechanisms.

Writing in Science: A Fundamental Skill for Scientists

Phillip Nagley
Monash University, Australia

Phillip Nagley is Professor Emeritus in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Monash University, in Melbourne, Australia. He is also Honorary Professorial Fellow at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne. He obtained his PhD from Monash University in 1972. Researching mitochondria, in both yeast and mammalian cells, he studied many topics relating to the formation of these organelles as well as the role of mitochondria in cell death. His contributions to neuroscience over the past 15 years have been involved with studies on how neurons respond to stress. He has characterised the different sorts of cell death that neurons undergo, using various cellular models of neuronal development and neurodegenerative diseases. He has published more than 210 research papers and scientific review articles. His contributions to education and training span more than 40 years in teaching and curriculum development, with emphasis on experiential activities for students and their assessment. He has served as Director of Education in the School of Biomedical Sciences. Professor Nagley has extensive experience in mentoring young (and not so young) scientists. During his career he has trained 30 successful PhD candidates and more than 30 post-doctoral fellows. He is a former President of the Australian Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and is currently Secretary General of FAOBMB. He has especially fostered the development of young scientists through these national and international science leadership roles. Has a particular interest in developing the skills of young scientists in writing in science.

Regulation of Tumorigenesis by Stress Kinase Signaling

Angel Nebreda


Angel Nebreda
IRB, Spain

Angel R. Nebreda obtained his PhD in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Salamanca (Spain) and then worked as a postdoc at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda (USA), and the Cancer Research-UK Clare Hall Laboratories in South Mimms (UK), with Tim Hunt. In 1995, he started his own group at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg (Germany) and 9 years later he moved to the newly created Spanish National Cancer Research Centre in Madrid (Spain). Since 2010, he is an ICREA Research Professor at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), in Barcelona (Spain). His research interests focus on mechanisms of signal integration by protein kinases, particularly in relation to cell cycle progression and cell survival, and how signaling pathways orchestrate different cellular responses during tumorigenesis.

Reversing the Paradigm:  Protein Kinase C as a Tumor Suppressor

Alexandra Newton
University of California, San Diego, USA

Alexandra Newton studies the molecular mechanisms of cell signaling and how these are disrupted in disease. She has a double major in Biochemistry and French Literature from Simon Fraser University (1980) and a PhD in Chemistry from Stanford University (1986). Following postdoctoral studies in the lab of Daniel E. Koshland, Jr. at the University of California, Berkeley (1986-1988), she joined the Chemistry Department of Indiana University (1988-1995), moving to the University of California San Diego in 1995 where she is now Professor of Pharmacology. Her lab has made seminal contributions in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of protein kinase C, work that led to the discovery of the phosphatase PH domain Leucine Repeat Protein Phosphatase (PHLPP).

Genetically Encoded Protein Phosphorylation

Patrick O’Donoghue
University of California, San Diego, USA

Patrick O’Donoghue is a Canada Research Chair and, since 2013, has been Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at The University of Western Ontario. He received a bachelor’s degree in biophysics and a Ph.D. in chemistry, supervised by Zan Luthey-Schulten, at The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was a postdoctoral fellow with Carl Woese at Illinois and then at Yale University with Dieter Söll. His research focuses on developing methods for site-specific insertion of post-translational modifications into proteins and applying these methods to elucidate the role of protein modifications in signalling networks linked to cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase; Feedback Inhibition, Rewiring and Mechanisms of Resistance

Morag Park
McGill University, Canada

Morag Park, Ph.D., F.R.S.C. Dr. Morag Park is a Professor in the Departments of Oncology and Biochemistry and joined McGill in 1989. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, James McGill Professor and holds the Diane and Sal Guerrera Chair in Cancer Genetics at McGill University. Dr. Park received a BSc. with first class honors from the University of Glasgow her PhD in Viral carcinogenesis at the Medical Research Council Virology Institute in Scotland and completed postdoctoral training at the National Institutes for Cancer Research in Washington DC, US. She joined McGill University in 1988. She was the Director of the Molecular Oncology Group at the McGill University Hospital Centre (2006-8), Scientific Director of the Institute of Cancer Research for the CIHR (2008-13), co-chair of the Canadian Cancer Research Alliance (2008-2010) and is now Director of the Goodman Cancer Research Centre (2013-present). Dr. Park is a research leader in the field of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) and mechanisms of oncogenic activation of RTKs in human cancers. She has recently developed leadership in the breast cancer microenvironment. She is the elected chair of the Tumour Microenvironment Network of the American Association for Cancer Research (2015-2017). She is a recent recipient of a Canadian Cancer Research Alliance Award (2015) for Exceptional Leadership in Cancer Research. She has more than 170 publications.

Charting the Human Centrosome-Cilium Landscape

Laurence Pelletier


Laurence Pelletier
University of Toronto, Canada

The Pelletier lab studies several facets of centrosome biogenesis and function, with a particular emphasis on how their perturbation can lead to devastating developmental diseases and cancer. By organizing PCM, centrosomes orchestrate several fundamental cellular processes including bipolar mitotic spindle assembly/positioning and cell motility. Centrosome also templates the formation of cilia and flagella, key cellular appendages that play important roles during animal development through myriad of signaling cascades. Using functional proteomics, in combination with cutting-edge microscopy and biochemistry, the overreaching goal of the lab is to identify and study novel proteins and protein complexes required for these processes, and to illuminate their role in development and diseases.

Molecular Mechanism of Cytokinesis

Thomas Pollard, Gairdner Award Winner (2006)
Yale University, USA

Thomas Pollard graduated from Pomona College in 1964 with honors in Chemistry and Zoology. At Harvard Medical School he began to investigate cellular motility. As a faculty member at Harvard Medical School, Johns Hopkins Medical School, Salk Institute and Yale, his research group has focused on the molecular basis of cellular motility and cytokinesis. His laboratory discovered and characterized proteins that produce forces for cells to move. They combined microscopy, biochemistry, biophysics, molecular biology and mathematical modeling to provide the quantitative evidence required to formulate and test a detailed molecular explanation for how Arp2/3 complex stimulates the assembly of actin filaments that produce forces for cellular movements and endocytosis. His group is now using the same approaches to learn how fission yeast cells divide in two during cytokinesis. In addition to research and teaching, Pollard chaired his departments at the Johns Hopkins Medical School and Yale, served as President of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and recently was Dean of the Graduate School at Yale. He is now Sterling Professor at Yale. Pollard served as president of two scientific societies and in leadership positions at the National Academy of Sciences. Pollard’s honors include the Gairdner International Award, E.B. Wilson Award from the American Society for Cell Biology and membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine.

Caveolin-1, a Jekyll and Hyde in Cancer

Andrew Quest
Universidad de Chile, Chile

Andrew Quest did his undergraduate and post-graduate training at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zuerich, Switzerland and got his PhD from that institution in 1988. He then trained as a post-doctoral fellow with Dr. B.M. Shapiro, University of Washington, Seattle working on lipid modifications of enzymes. In 1991, he moved to Duke University Medical Center, Durham for a second post-doctoral training stage with Dr. R.M. Bell studying how lipids regulate the activity of protein kinase C (PKC). In 1994, he took up a position as an Assistant Professor at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland where he developed a keen interest in the scaffolding protein Caveolin-1 (CAV1), and then showed that it functions as a tumor suppressor in colon cancer cells. In 1999, he took up a position as Associate Professor in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile and set up a lab there between 1999-2000. In 2005 he became Full Professor at the same institution. In Chile, his group discovered that CAV1 controls -catenin/Tcf-Lef-dependent transcription of the cancer-related genes survivin and cyclo-oxygenase-2, but only does so in the presence of E-cadherin. His group then turned to studying what CAV1 does in cancer cells lacking E-cadherin and showed that the protein promotes migration, invasion and metastasis by activating a novel signaling axis linking CAV1 to Rab5 and then Rac1 activation. Thus, CAV1 plays a dual role in cancer by promoting metastasis in the absence of E-cadherin, but acting as a tumor suppressor in the presence of E-cadherin.

Posttranslational Modification

Brian Raught


Brian Raught
University of Toronto, Canada

Biography TBA

Improved Mitochondrial Function in Huntington’s Disease through Regulation of PDH Activity

Ana Cristina Rego


Ana Cristina Rego
Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal

Ana Cristina Rego (ACR) received the Ph.D. in Cell Biology in 1999 at the University of Coimbra (UC), under the supervision of Prof. Catarina R. Oliveira, and was postdoctoral researcher and visiting scientist in the lab of Prof. David G. Nicholls, at the University of Dundee, Scotland, U.K., and at the Buck Institute, Novato, CA, U.S.A., from 1998-2000. ACR is tenure Assistant Professor since 1999, lecturing classes of Biochemistry, Neuroscience and Neurobiology at the Faculty of Medicine-UC where she initiated as a Teaching Assistant in 1997; in 2010 she obtained the academic degree of ‘Agregação’. She is the head of “Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Signaling in Neurodegeneration” research group at the Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology (CNC) since 2003. In 2004 and 2005 ACR coordinated the BEB PhD Programme at CNC. ACR scientific interests lie in the field of neurodegenerative diseases, by studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of familial and age-related disorders, including Huntington’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. ACR is an author of 95 international peer-reviewed publications, with more than 3800 citations and an h-index of 34. She supervised and co-supervised 15 PhD students, 5 post-doctoral fellows and 25 Master students. ACR also coordinated, as Principal Investigator, 13 competitive-funding projects over the last 10 years. Funding as PI has been garnered by HighQ Foundation (USA), Lundbeck Foundation, ‘Instituto de Investigação Interdisciplinar’ (IIIUC), Faculty of Medicine-UC, ‘Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia’ (FCT) projects; recently she received two awards, from ‘Santa Casa da Misericórdia de Lisboa’ (SCML), and ‘Fundação Luso Americana para o Desenvolvimento’ (FLAD). ACR is expert reviewer for 67 scientific journals. Editor of “Interaction Between Neurons and Glia in Ageing and Disease”, Springer, 2007; current member of the Editorial Board of SRL Alzheimer’s & Parkinson’s Disease and Frontiers in Pharmacology. ACR is also the Vice-President of the board of ‘Sociedade Portuguesa de Neurociências’ (SPN).

The Other Synapse: Calcium-Dependent Exocytosis in the Immune System

Jens Rettig
Universität des Saarlandes, Germany

Personal: Born in Berlin, Germany on October 1, 1963. Married, two children.
Education: Diploma in Chemistry 1990; Dr. rer. nat. 1993; Habilitation 1999.
Positions: 91-93 PhD student Center for Molecular Neurobiology Hamburg (Pongs); 94-95 Postdoc University of Washington Seattle (Catterall); 95-00 Group leader Max-Planck-Institute for biophysical Chemistry Göttingen (Neher); since 00 Full Professor, Saarland University.
More than 70 peer-reviewed publications with an IF of over 600 and more than 5000 citations. h-index: 40.

Epigenomic Targets in Cancer and Aging

Karl Riabowol


Karl Riabowol
University of Calgary, Canada

Karl Riabowol (Ph.D.) is currently a Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Oncology in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Calgary where he directs a research laboratory focussed on cell aging and immortalization. He served as Head of the Cancer Biology Research Group, Vice Director of the Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, was a founding Member of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Institute of Aging Advisory Board. After training with Drs. Caleb Finch (Director of the Neurobiology section of the Andrus Gerontology Center, University of Southern California), Bernard Strehler (cofounder of the United States National Institute of Aging in the NIH) and Sam Goldstein (past director of the GRECC Gerontology Institute), Dr. Riabowol undertook postdoctoral research and later took a Staff Associate position at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory N.Y., before becoming a staff member at the University of Calgary in 1991. He is the recipient of numerous awards, holds 9 issued patents in the area of cyclin and tumour suppresser molecular biology and serves as a frequent reviewer for many journals and for the National Science Foundation, USA, the Human Frontier Science Program in Strasbourg France, the National Institutes of Health, USA, and the Wellcome Trust in the U.K., among others. He has published reviews and research papers in journals of the highest impact and circulation such as Science, Nature, Cell, Nature Genetics, Nature Cell Biology, Cell Reports, PNAS and others. His laboratory works to understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for enforcing the genetic senescence program during cellular aging and how the program is circumvented when cells escape aging and become immortal cancer cells. His group has found that tumour suppressers, including a novel family that they discovered and called the ING proteins for INhibitors of Growth, are activated in aging cells. Since they are also inactivated in tumour cells, this provides additional support for the idea that the normal aging program can be thought of as an anti-oncogenesis mechanism. Their ongoing research program focuses upon determining how we can regulate the normal activity of these tumour suppressors to block the growth of cancer cells and to extend the replicative lifespan or normal cells through epigenetic modification. Work in the Riabowol laboratory also includes examination of telomere biology and the role of replicative senescence in aging and age-related diseases, focusing upon aspects of chromatin remodelling and functions of the ING family of type II tumour suppressors.

Protein Glycation and Its Prevention in Disease and Aging

Izabela Sadowska-Bartosz


Izabela Sadowska-Bartosz
Uniwersytet Rzeszowski, Poland

Biography TBA

eIF4E-Dependent Regulation of mRNA Translation Controls Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Self-Renewal

Nahum Sonenberg, Gairdner Award Winner (2008)
McGill University, Canada

Nahum Sonenberg studies the molecular basis of the control of protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells and its importance in diseases such as cancer, obesity, diabetes and neurological diseases. He is known for discovering, with Aaron Shatkin, the mRNA 5’ cap-binding protein, eIF4E, in 1978. He was born in Germany in 1946. He received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the Weizmann Institute of Science (Rehovot, Israel) in 1976, and then joined the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology in Nutley, New Jersey as a Chaim Weizmann Postdoctoral Fellow. In 1979 he moved to Montreal to become an Assistant Professor and later Professor at McGill University. Since 2002 Dr. Sonenberg is a James McGill Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and the Rosalind & Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University. He has received numerous awards (Wolf Prize-2014, Rosenstiel Award-2011, Gairdner Award-2008, Killam Prize-2005), and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of London (2006) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2012), a Foreign Honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2006), as well as a Foreign member of the NAS and International member of the NAM since 2015.

Ligand-Induced CD36 Receptor Nanoclusters Growth and Compaction Promote Signal Transduction

Nicolas Touret


Nicolas Touret
University of Alberta, Canada

Nicolas Touret is an associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Alberta. After receiving his Ph.D. degree in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis in France, Dr. Touret carried out post-doctoral training in the Department of Cell Biology at Sickkids Hospital in Toronto under the supervision of Dr. Sergio Grinstein.
Since his PhD, he has been interested in membrane proteins and the dynamic organization of the plasma membrane.
His current research involves study of membrane receptors signal transduction mechanisms in relation to the plasma membrane ultrastructure. His group uses advanced live cell imaging and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to decipher these mechanisms in the context of pathophysiological condition such as host-pathogen interaction and cancer.

Regulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels by Calcium Ions and Auxiliary Subunits

Filip van Petegem
University of British Columbia, Canada

Filip Van Petegem performed his undergraduate and PhD studies at Ghent University, Belgium. There he was trained as a structural biologist, solving crystal structures of extremophilic enzymes in the lab of Jozef Van Beeumen. This work allowed him to peer into the adaptation mechanisms of enzymes to extreme cold and hot temperatures. In 2002 he joined the laboratory of Daniel Minor at UCSF for postdoctoral work on ion channels. There he produced the first high-resolution structures of voltage-gated calcium channel domains. By combining X-ray crystallography with electrophysiology, he was able to help decipher the mechanisms through which beta subunits and calmodulin regulate the voltage-gated calcium channel. He joined the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at UBC in july 2007, where he received tenure in 2012. His research program focuses on understanding the mechanisms of ion channels in native and diseased states. A major theme in his lab includes the Ryanodine Receptor, a 2.2MDa calcium release channel located in the ER and SR, and his lab has been able to decipher several allosteric mechanisms of this membrane protein giant. Another theme includes voltage-gated sodium channels, proteins that carry the upstroke of action potentials in excitable cells. His lab has been funded by the CIHR, the Human Frontiers in Science Program, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

SLAM Family Receptors and Immune Responses

André Veillette


André Veillette
IRCN, Canada

Biography TBA

Investigating Signal Transduction in Drosophila: A Powerful Model for Disease Mechanisms

Esther Verheyen


Esther Verheyen
Simon Fraser University, Canada

Esther Verheyen is a Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada. She completed her undergraduate BA degree at Cornell University (1988). She carried out her PhD (1993) at Yale University School of Medicine with Lynn Cooley examining regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by profiling in Drosophila. During her postdoc in Spyros Artvanis-Tsakonas\’ lab, also at Yale, she became interested in regulation of signal transduction pathways during patterning and growth of tissues. In 1998 she joined the faculty at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada, where she is carrying out research on protein kinase regulation of signal transduction, as well as teaching various undergraduate genetics courses. Her research is funded by grants from CIHR and NSERC to investigate organ formation, cell communication and Wnt signal regulation. She has served on several Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) grant review panels, and is a member of the Editorial Board of PLoS ONE. She is currently serving as the Canada Representative on the Drosophila Board of Directors (FlyBoard) for 2016-2019.

Apoptosis

Xiao Dong Wang


Xiao Dong Wang
National Institute of Biological Sciences, China

Biography TBA

Protein Complexes that Modify Chromatin for Transcription

Jerry Workman
Stowers Institute for Medical Research, USA

Jerry L. Workman, Ph.D. Investigator, Stowers Institute for Medical Research Dr. Workman researches chromatin remodeling and histone modification for the initiation and elongation of transcription. After receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1985, Dr. Workman joined Dr. Roeder’s lab as an NIH postdoctoral fellow studying the role of nucleosomes in transcription regulation. In 1988 he worked as a Research Fellow at Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts General Hospital under Robert Kingston. He began his own lab at Penn State University in 1992, where he pioneered the study of ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling complexes and purified the first transcription co-activator/histone acetyltransferase complexes. There he was awarded the Faculty Scholars Medal for Outstanding Achievement in the Life and Health Sciences. He was also chosen as a Stohlman Scholar by the Leukemia Society of America and was appointed an investigator by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He moved to the Stowers Institute in 2003. In 2013, Dr. Workman was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Mechanistic Diversity in Antibiotic Resistance

Gerry Wright


Gerry Wright
McMaster University, Canada

Gerry Wright is the Director of the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research, a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, an Associate member in the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine. He received his BSc in Biochemistry (1986) and his PhD in Chemistry (1990) from the University of Waterloo. He pursued his postdoctoral research at Harvard Medical School (1991-1992). In 1993, Dr. Wright joined the Department of Biochemistry at McMaster.
He holds the Michael G. DeGroote Chair in Infection and Anti-Infective Research and a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Antibiotic Biochemistry. From 2001-2007 Dr. Wright served as Chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences at McMaster.
Dr. Wright was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (2012) and a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology (2013). He is the recipient of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Scientist (2000-2005), Medical Research Council of Canada Scholar (1995-2000), Killam Research Fellowship (2011-1012), R.G.E. Murray Award for Career Achievement of the Canadian Society of Microbiologists, Premier’s Research Excellence (1999) and the Polanyi Prize (1993). He has served on grant panel advisory boards and Chaired grant panels for a number of granting agencies in Canada, the US and Europe.
He is the author of over 230 manuscripts and is a member of the editorial boards of several scientific peer-reviewed journals including mBio, ACS Infectious Diseases, Chemistry and Biology and the Journal of Antibiotics.

Molecular Regulation of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms

Michael Young, Gairdner Award Winner (2012)
Rockefeller University, USA

Biography TBA

Mechanisms and Pathologies of Protein Transport into the Endoplasmic Reticulum

Richard Zimmermann
Universität des Saarlandes, Germany

Richard Zimmermann received Dipl.Biol. and Dr.rer.nat. degrees in Biochemistry from Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich and Georg-August University in Göttingen (both Germany), respectively. At the time he worked with Walter Neupert on the biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins, specifically the mechanism of protein import into mitochondria. In 1981 he joined William (Bill) Wickner´s laboratory at UCLA (Los Angeles, USA) as a post-doctoral fellow and focussed his attention on the biogenesis of bacterial membrane proteins. In 1983 Zimmermann became an independent research associate at Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich and started his work on the mechanism of transport of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of mammalian cells. He observed that ER-import of small presecretory proteins into the ER involves cytosolic molecular chaperones and occurs independently of SRP and SRP-receptor. In 1991 he joined the medical schools of Georg-August University in Göttingen as an associate professor and in 1995 of Saarland University (Homburg, Germany) as a full professor, respectively. Since 2005 he heads the Competence Center for Molecular Medicine at Saarland University. His current work is focussed on structural and mechanistic aspects of gating of the Sec61 complex, the polypeptide conducting channel in the ER membrane, and related diseases (termed Sec61-channelopathies).

Role of Mitochondrial Dynamics on Metabolic Homeostasis

Antonio Zorzano


Antonio Zorzano
Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), University of Barcelona, CIBERDEM

Biography TBA

Nutritional Risk Factors for Colon and Breast Cancers and Multiple Sclerosis

Harald zur Hausen, Nobel Prize (2008)
German Cancer Centre, Heidelberg

Harald zur Hausen is a virologist and cancer researcher who discovered the important role that human papillomavirus plays in cervical cancer. His ground-breaking research in the 1970s and 1980s paved the way for the development of the HPV vaccine in 2006 for which he was honored with the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2008. He also studied the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV).
Zur Hausen studied medicine at the Universities of Bonn, Hamburg, and Düsseldorf. He worked in the virus laboratories of the Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia and as a senior scientist at the Institute of Wuerzburg. In 1972, he was appointed chairman and professor of virology at the University of Erlangen-Nuernberg and in 1977he moved to the University of Freiburg. From 1983 until 2003 he served as scientific director of the German Cancer Research Center. He is an elected member of various research organizations and academies.

 

Save

Follow IUBMB 2016:

Facebook Twitter

CONFERENCE SECRETARIAT

Switch To Full Site